Becoming Consciously Aware of your Unconscious Competence
Last week, Tony Pinelle had the pleasure of training with member of the staff of the Colorado Department of Human Services. We were conducting a Verbal Defense & Influence Instructor Class at the Wheat Ridge Regional Center. These instructor represented the group homes operated by the State of Colorado. You noticed that I said that we were training with these instructors – not merely training them. As is often the case with the contact professionals that we train, we learn as much from them as they learn from us. The reason for this exchange of information is the fact that the experienced staff that attend these training sessions are often “unconscious competents” who know how to do their jobs exceptionally well – even though they often don’t know how to explain what they do so well. They are like a sports player who plays a great game without knowing exactly what they do. They are players, not coaches. What happened during our training session is that they became “consciously aware of their unconscious competence.” The Verbal Defense & Influence Instructor Training provides a template to explain exactly what they do so well. This training can now be replicated for new staff members so they can learn before experiencing it themselves - what experienced staff member do so well. Tony and I salute the Colorado Department of Human Services for their expertise, compassion, and empathy for those persons entrusted to their care.

Becoming Consciously Aware of your Unconscious Competence
Last week, Tony Pinelle had the pleasure of training with member of the staff of the Colorado Department of Human Services. We were conducting a Verbal Defense & Influence Instructor Class at the Wheat Ridge Regional Center. These instructor represented the group homes operated by the State of Colorado. You noticed that I said that we were training with these instructors – not merely training them.

As is often the case with the contact professionals that we train, we learn as much from them as they learn from us. The reason for this exchange of information is the fact that the experienced staff that attend these training sessions are often “unconscious competents” who know how to do their jobs exceptionally well – even though they often don’t know how to explain what they do so well. They are like a sports player who plays a great game without knowing exactly what they do. They are players, not coaches.

What happened during our training session is that they became “consciously aware of their unconscious competence.” The Verbal Defense & Influence Instructor Training provides a template to explain exactly what they do so well. This training can now be replicated for new staff members so they can learn before experiencing it themselves – what experienced staff member do so well.

Tony and I salute the Colorado Department of Human Services for their expertise, compassion, and empathy for those persons entrusted to their care.

Vistelar Group –